Friday, August, 11 2017

Rival Entertainment Presents:

with AJ Ghent Band & Mac McComb

img img

ALL THE LOCALS

Doors 7:30pm / Show 8:30pm / All Ages / $10 Advance / $12 Day of Show

  • img
  • img
  • img
  • img

ABOUT

• All Ages Welcome
• Vinyl is a general admission, standing room venue
• Tickets available online via Ticketalternative.com or without ticket fees in person at the Center Stage Box Office, M-F, 11-6. Online sales end at 6pm on day of show.


It's been said the newest members of Atlanta's booming music scene have a sound that's a clear "amalgamation of blues, neo-soul, and rock-and-roll". Giving Pink Floyd and Maxwel a run for their money, All The Locals are no strangers to the industry. Atlanta-based producer, John Briglevich (who worked with the band on their newest set of rhythmically seductive songs), says, "...[their music is] hard to describe and that why I dig it. I'm scrambling to try and make this [EP] sound as good as they do live."

Praised for their effortlessly original and creative approach to songwriting, A.T.L's self-titled debut EP is due out later this year. "We all know good music when we hear it. [Our music] feels good", Deno, A.T.L's drummer extraordinaire, has commented. Well, Deno, the public agrees.

Night Beds, the musical project of 26-year-old Colorado Springs native Winston Yellen, received much acclaim for his 2013 debut album, Country Sleep, scoring plaudits for its tortured take on alt country and Yellen's soaring vocals. But Yellen has always been much more than another singer-songwriter. "When Country Sleep came out, I had never made songs like that before," explains Yellen, who currently splits his time between Nashville and Los Angeles. "That was a departure for me. That wasn't my bread and butter." The charismatic, enticingly unhinged Yellen had been living in a house that used to belong to Johnny Cash and the atmosphere had taken an effect, but after finishing that album and before Country Sleep was even released, Yellen began experimenting with the kind of melancholic, neon-tinged R&B that makes up the mesmerising Ivywild.

However, it is not all change. The thread that weaves through all of Yellen's music and holds it together is his unmistakable voice – plaintive, yearning, soulful, heartbreaking. Whether it's ascending over the luscious epic-electronics of "Tide Teeth" or aching alone on Country Sleep's opener "Faithful Heights", Yellen's voice has a unique beauty matched by few of his contemporaries. It is a voice that reveals the qualities of a life spent listening to the greats of jazz and soul and yet sounds so utterly of this moment. The move from the debut to this astounding second album, in this context, is totally natural and indicative of the talents and strength of Night Beds – an ability to turn his craft towards any sound and make it his own.

The second Night Beds album draws on Yellen's original love of Bill Evans through to J Dilla and is made up of what Yellen calls "sad sex jams" and was inspired by a long-term love and a break-up which looms large throughout the albums veiled lyrics. Its genesis can be found in the stoned night in Nashville when Yellen first heard Yeezus. Lying on the floor, Yellen blared the album at top volume. "All the emotions that I had kept inside came flooding out. Being a white nerdy kid from Colorado Springs, I was attracted to that sound. I was tired of being a sad sack like Elliott Smith or Ryan Adams. I wanted to be physical. I wanted to make music that was physical." Like many young Americans, he's had his fair share of battles with dependence and while touring Country Sleep he and his backing band came close to falling apart; these days, though, he doesn't dabble with anything harder than white wine and weed.